Wine History 

The name for the fluid obtained from the grapes - wine, comes from the Georgian word GVINO. The oldest vessel for wine storage and aging – Qvevri (VI-Vmillennium BC) was discovered in Georgia.

In 2013, UNESCO inscribed the Ancient Georgian Traditional Qvevri Wine-Making Method on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. This fact is another recognition of the centuries-long existence of viticulture and winemaking in Georgia.

Vine and the Human – merged into one is a historical event, while the result, achieved through their interactions is the beginning of the Georgian civilization, which should be dated at least by VI millennium B.C., such is the unshakable conclusion of the scientists.

The Georgian National Museum preserves the oldest grape pips in the world, dated by 8000 years, which were discovered on Georgian territory. Since that time, Georgians and the vine have been taking a centuries-long journey down the road of the development of mankind. This inseparable unity is one of the manifestations of Georgian identity and a sign of our uniqueness.

The genetic fund of the Georgian vine consists of over 500 endemic varieties and is the richest in the world. Similarly, rich and diverse are the Georgian tastes, determined by the diversity of the Georgian vine species – there exist as many tastes as the species of the grapes. Our ancestors believed that if a man had a vineyard and looked after him, he had a homeland too.

Our ancestors believed, that a man who possessed a vineyard, consequently had a fatherland, too. This belief is also confirmed in the Law Book of king Vakhtang VI. Winemaking has been a sacred activity for Georgians – the vine was a symbol of life in Georgia.

The influence of vine culture can be traced in many fields of Georgian culture – folklore and polyphonic songs, mythology or poetry, architecture or fine art.

Over the centuries generations conveyed the tradition of wine – the divine drink, taste and scent of which comes from depths of millennia.

The influence of vine culture can be traced in many fields of Georgian culture – folklore and polyphonic songs, mythology or poetry, architecture or fine art.

Over the centuries generations conveyed the tradition of wine – the divine drink, taste and scent of which comes from depths of millennia.